Leading UK Podiatrist and nail laser specialist, Martine Abrahams to talk at 2013 UK Society of Chiropodists and Podiatrists’ annual conference

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ACC Liverpool 13 – 16th November 2013

The UK’s leading nail laser specialist, Martine Abrahams of the London Nail Laser Clinic, will be presenting at this year’s conference.  She will be showcasing the state-of-art low level Lunula Laser – the only PAINLESS, bone fide treatment on the market for treatment of nail fungal infections.  As the clinic director of a successful, growing business, part of her talk will also incorporate some business development advice.

As seen on ITV’s This Morning: http://www.lunulasuccess.com/media.aspx

Lunula Low Level Laser explained:

Until now, treatments for fungal nail infections have been rather hit and miss, with oral medication causing side effects, topical treatments unable to penetrate the nail bed and surgical options limited to complete removal of the nail.  The PinPointe Foot Laser proved a useful (but uncomfortable) remedy.  In 2012, the Rolls Royce of foot lasers launched – the ‘cold’ laser or Lunula Low Level Laser – and is now in the UK, revolutionising fungal treatments.  Not only PAIN FREE, this innovative technology tackles the underlying cause of the infection, rather than just the symptoms.

How does it work? Unlike conventional solutions, the Lunula Low Level Laser is the first treatment to tackle the root cause of nail fungus – not just the symptoms.  Known as the ‘COLD’ laser – this new device does not rely on heat to treat, instead utilises two light wavelengths, 635nm and 405nm, to tackle differing cell membranes.  The light is passed over the whole foot, which has a four-fold benefit:

  1. stimulates and improves nail bed blood supply (great news for diabetic patients)
  2. improves immune response
  3. breaks down the fungal cells walls by disturbing their oxygen content, killing spores
  4. can also improve Athlete’s Foot

BEFORE Lunula Laser:

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AFTER 8 MONTHS:

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As Victoria Beckham’s bunions hit headlines in UK, leading podiatrist Martine Abrahams shines a light on this painful and ugly condition

vb-bunion-oct-13As Victoria Beckham’s bunions make headlines in the UK (once more!), I thought I would explain the condition, solutions and recovery for those of you in a similar predicament.

Bunions are certainly not life threatening, but can cause a great deal of grief, pain and discomfort for sufferers.   They can be hereditary, and can often be caused by external pressure from ill-fitting shoes or regular wearing of vertiginous heels – á la Posh Spice!

A bunion is a bony lump that forms at the base of the big toe, where it attaches to the foot.  Often, the big toe deviates towards the other toes. When this occurs, the base of the big toe pushes outwards on the first metatarsal bone – which is the bone directly behind the big toe – forming a bunion.

As a bunion occurs at a joint where the toe bends during normal walking, the entire body weight rests on the bunion at each step, causing a great deal of pain. They are also vulnerable to excess pressure and friction from shoes and can lead to the additional problem of calluses and painful corns.

Diagnosis:

Bunions are usually easily recognised thanks to their classic shape, but often an X-ray will be performed to check the extent of the deformity.  A blood test might also be arranged to rule out various forms of arthritis.  A formal diagnosis enables the best course of treatment – insoles, orthopaedic shoes, medication, surgery or other treatment…

Many bunion sufferers live with their toe deformity, wearing increasingly comfortable shoes and avoiding footwear that cause severe pain.  It’s probably a good idea to consult with a podiatrist who will then refer you on to a Podiatric Surgeon if surgery is a viable option.

Treatment options:

bunion_and_xrayYou podiatrist may suggest over-the-counter pain relief, as well as medication to relieve the swelling and inflammation.  A heat pad or warm footbath may also help relieve the immediate pain and discomfort – ice packs can also help.

If your bunion isn’t persistently painful and you take action early on, changing to well made, well-fitting shoes may be all the treatment you need.  Your podiatrist may advise an orthotic device that can improve and realign the bones of your foot (i.e. bunion pads, splints, shoe inserts, bespoke insoles and uppers…)

Surgery may be recommended for some bunions, but only when symptoms are severe enough to warrant such intervention.

Surgery for a bunion, called a bunionectomy, is done in hospital usually under general anaesthesia.  The surgeon can often realign the bone behind the big toe by cutting the ligaments at the joint. For a severe bunion, you may need to have the bone cut in a technique called an osteotomy. Wires or screws may be inserted to keep the bones in line, and excess bone may be shaved off or removed.